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Top 10 Rules for Electric Safety

To play it safe around your home, just remember the rules for using electricity the right way.

Don't overload electrical outlets

1. DON'T plug a bunch of stuff into one outlet or extension cord.

It could damage the electrical system in your house or even cause a fire.

   

Keep babies away from electrical outlets

2. DO ask grown-ups to put safety caps on all unused electrical outlets.

Covering outlets will also help save energy by stopping cold drafts.

   

Don't pull on an electrical cord

3. DON’T yank an electrical cord from the wall.

Pulling on a cord can damage the appliance, the plug or the outlet.

   

Keep pets away from electrical cords

4. DO make sure all electric cords are tucked away, neat and tidy.

Pets might chew on electrical cords, and people might trip and fall.

   

Ask a grown-up for help plugging things in

5. DO ask a grown-up for help when you need to use something that uses electricity.

   

Don't climb trees near power lines

6. DO look up and look out for power lines before you climb a tree.

The electricity can go right through the tree branch - and right through you!

   

Don't play near utility equipment

7. DON'T ever climb the fence around an electrical substation.

If a ball or pet gets inside the fence, ask a grown-up to call the electric company - they'll come and get it out for you.

   

Keep ladders away from power lines

8. DO remind your mom or dad to watch out for power lines when they're using a ladder, chainsaw or other outdoor equipment.

   

Keep electrical cords away from water

9. DO keep electrical stuff far away from water.

Most electrical accidents around the house happen when people use electricity near water.

   

Don't fly kites near power lines

10. DON’T fly a kite near power lines.

The kite and the string may conduct electricity – sending it right through you to the ground.

   

Test your safety smarts!

Now that you’re done reading the rules, try these fun games to test your safety smarts:

Indoor electrical safety game

Outdoor electrical safety game


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Fun stuff to print out

Make a Safety Comic Strip
[PDF format – one page]

Do an Energy Safety Survey
[PDF format – one page]

Alliant Energy Kids activity book
[PDF format – eight pages]


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Links for teachers and parents:

Energy safety lesson plans

Energy safety classroom presentations

Energy safety activities

More online safety resources

 

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HTTP/1.1 200 OK Server: Apache Connection: keep-alive Date: Sat, 19 May 2007 13:53:00 GMT Content-type: text/html Content-Length: 30368 How Electricity Get To Your Home
Click here to go to Alliant Energy Kids Home   Search
Energy Basics
Playing It Safe Energy and the Environment Fun and Games Teachers and Parents
 
   
 

 

How Electricity Gets To Your Home

It's always there whenever you flip a switch or plug in a cord - but electricity has to travel a long way to get to your house. In fact, the power plant where your electricity is made might be hundreds of miles away!

All the poles and wires you see along the highway and in front of your house are called the electrical transmission and distribution system. Using hydroelectric power from Niagara Falls, scientist Nikola Tesla designed the first full-scale electric system in the early 1900s.

Today, power plants all across the country are connected to each other through the electrical system (sometimes called the “power grid”). If one power plant can’t produce enough electricity to run all the air conditioners when it’s hot, another power plant can send some where it’s needed.

Here’s how the electricity gets to your house:

   

Power plant

Electricity is made at a power plant by huge generators. Most power plants use coal, but some use natural gas, water or even wind.

   

Transformers

The current is sent through transformers to increase the voltage to push the power long distances.

   

Transmission lines

The electrical charge goes through high-voltage transmission lines that stretch across the country.

   

Substation

It reaches a substation, where the voltage is lowered so it can be
sent on smaller power lines.

   

Distribution lines

It travels through distribution lines to your neighborhood, where smaller pole-top transformers reduce the voltage again to take the power safe to use in our homes.

   

Electric meter

It connects to your house through the service drop and passes through a meter that measures how much our family uses.

   

Service panel

The electricity goes to the service panel in your basement or garage, where breakers or fuses protect the wires inside your house from being overloaded.

   

Appliances and outlet

The electricity travels through wires inside the walls to the outlets and switches all over your house.


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Want to learn more?

If you’d like to learn more about the electrical power system, visit this Web page:

What Is Electricity? By the U.S. Energy Information Administration


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Links for teachers and parents:

How Stuff Works: Electricity and How Stuff Works: Power Grids
[Warning: this site contains multiple pop-up and animated ads]

Edison Electric Institute: Energy Infrastructure

More resources for teachers and parents

 

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  Alliant Energy Kids is presented by Alliant Energy
 
Questions? Call 1-800-ALLIANT (255-4268), use or Contact Us form, or E-mail us.    Legal & Copyright | Privacy